Sex Education Policy

Aims and Objectives

Sex Education is taught in line with the Department for Education’s guidelines, which require that Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) in schools is best planned as part of PSHE, Citizenship and the Healthy School’s curriculum. Please read this policy alongside the Child Protection Policy.

Sex and Relationships Education is an integral part of the lifelong learning process which should encourage personal and social development, fostering self esteem, self awareness and a sense of moral responsibility. We acknowledge that SRE should take place from an early age in a number of contexts, the home and the school.

We aim to:

  • Develop self awareness, self esteem, self protection and respect for others
  • Develop skills to make choices and decisions
  • Facilitate exploration of attitudes and values to develop communication and decision-making skills
  • Help children to recognise similarities and differences in each other
  • Help them to understand about family life and the relationship within families, friendships and the community
  • Help and support young people through their physical, emotional and moral development
  • Help children to understand how to keep safe and inform them of networks and agencies to turn to if needed
  • Prepare the children for puberty
  • Lay the foundations for social and personal developments
  • Develop relationship skills

Sex and Relationship Education and the Curriculum

See the curriculum map attached for when specific topics are taught (Appendix 1). SRE is taught within a moral framework which is sensitive to the needs and beliefs of all students and their parents and carers. Where possible, the community nurse will lead the Sex and Relationship Education talks (in single sex groups) in Year 6. Teachers will use “Notes for Guidance for Answering Children’s Questions” (Appendix 2). Assemblies, Circle Time and a week-long Theme Week “Anti-bullying and Healthy Eating” in Autumn Term are used to discuss issues such as friendship, bullying and changes in relationships.

Through the science curriculum, which is mandatory, pupils are taught about the physical aspects and structure of the body and the human life cycle including anatomy, puberty and biological aspects of sexual reproduction. This also includes healthy lifestyle information and personal hygiene.

Parents/carers

Parents will be given the opportunity to access this policy online on the school’s website and to preview the teaching resources, including films, prior to the lessons in Years 5 and 6. They will be informed that they can withdraw their child from any aspect of sex education which is marked in bold on the curriculum map (Appendix 1).

However, the other of aspects of SRE, which are part of the Science curriculum are compulsory (see Appendix 3 – related Science Curriculum).

Monitoring and evaluation

The Headteacher and the Healthy Schools/PSHE Subject Leader will monitor and evaluate the programme annually, taking into account any changes in legislation or guidelines.

Appendix 1

TEACHING SEX AND RELATIONSHIPS EDUCATION

CURRICULUM MAP

NURSERY/RECEPTION

The uniqueness of me.   Similarities between others and myself.

Naming external parts of the body – hands, feet, arms, legs, eyes, ears, chin etc.

Caring for babies – what do they need?  Visit from new baby, if possible.

Animal families – e.g. cows have calves, ducks have ducklings, etc.   What do young

animals need to grow and stay healthy?

The importance of families/my family.

Relationships – the people I love/special people.

Feelings:

Feeling happy, feeling sad (make happy and sad face pictures).

How to show my feelings.

How I recognise feelings in others.

Friendships:

Getting on together at school.

Caring and sharing.

Co-operation (turn taking).

Safety – Reception only

Under Friendship – people we trust – including support networks, Childline etc. Internet safety

YEAR ONE

Naming external body parts.

The beginning of life – me, animals and plants.

Growth in people, animals and plants.

Family Life:

How people live together – sharing and caring for each other.

Roles in the family.

Feelings:

What upsets me?   What do I do that upsets others?

Friendships:

Working together – sharing, working in pairs and in groups.

Co-operation.

Secrets – good and bad secrets.   How do we distinguish between them?

Safety

Under Friendship – people we trust – including support networks, Childline etc. Internet safety

YEAR TWO

Changes as we grow.   How have I changed from a baby to now?

Physical changes and changing responsibilities – for self and others.

Ageing – how do we know things are alive, dead, young or old?

Family life:

How people live together – sharing and caring for one another.

Roles in the family.

Feelings:

Anger, fear, love, jealousy.

Different kinds of love.

Separation, loss, mourning.

Frendships:

What helps people to get on together – listening and sharing?

What I like/dislike about other people.

Safety

Under Friendship – people we trust – including support networks, Childline etc. Internet safety

YEAR THREE

Naming external body parts, including sex organs, using correct vocabulary, draw round a child to create life size diagram.

How babies begin and are born.  How they grow.

How babies of different animals grow inside or outside their mother’s body.

Feelings:

When do I get angry, embarrassed, scared, upset?

How feeling can be hurt by actions and/or words.   Respecting other people’s

feelings.

Saying sorry.

Who are my special people?  Why are they special?

How do I feel when my special people go away or die?

Friendships:

Who are our friends?

How we make and lose friends?  Loyalty.

Safety

Under Friendship – people we trust – including support networks, Childline etc. Internet – social networking and mobile phone safety

YEAR FOUR

How have I grown?   Baby pictures, compare.

How will I grow in the future? Naming external body parts, including sex organs, using correct vocabulary

My role in my family (responsibilities).

Loss and separation.

The main stages of the human life cycle.

Feelings:

Feelings we share – Good – happy, safe, confident, proud, etc.

Bad   – lonely, sad, angry, afraid, etc.

Friendships:

Special people, friends.

Safety

Under Friendship – people we trust – including support networks Childline, etc. Internet – social networking and mobile phone safety

YEAR FIVE

Recap on correct names for sex organs.

Locate and name the parts of the body, including the sex organs – draw a picture of twin brother and sister coming out of the shower, label using correct terminology.

Hygiene*

Emotional and physical changes in puberty*

Growing up – menstruation. Coping with the first period – what happens and

why*

Feelings:

Recognising and coping with feelings.

Friendships:

People we can trust

Our roles in different relationships.

Other people’s expectations of us.

Safety

Under Friendship – people we trust – including support networks, Childline etc.

NSPCC workshops to be arranged if possible – support networks for emotional/physical abuse*

Internet – social networking and mobile phone safety

*LETTERS TO PARENTS/CARERS WILL BE SENT IN ADVANCE OF TEACHING OF THESE AREAS

YEAR SIX

Recap on emotional and physical changes in puberty/menstruation.

Changing relationships in the family as we grow up, sexual relationships.

Feelings:

Mood changes – why?   How do we feel?

‘Yes/no’ feelings. How can we cope if we find ourselves in a situation that makes us feel uncomfortable?

NSPCC workshops to be arranged if possible – support networks for emotional/physical abuse

Friendships:

Changing/making new friends/keeping friends.

Loss and separation.

Reproduction and pregnancy*

How a baby is conceived – stress importance of an established, loving relationship.

The birth of a baby.

Safety

Under Friendship – people we trust – including support networks, Childline etc. Internet – social networking and mobile phone safety

NSPCC workshops to be arranged if possible – support networks for emotional/physical abuse

*LETTERS TO PARENTS/CARERS WILL BE SENT IN ADVANCE OF TEACHING OF THESE AREAS

Appendix 3

Science Curriculum

Science key stage 1

Key Stage 1

Sc2 Life processes and living things

Life processes

1 Pupils should be taught:

  1. the differences between things that are living and things that have never been alive
  2. that animals, including humans, move, feed, grow, use their senses and reproduce c ) to relate life processes to animals and plants found in the local environment.

Humans and other animals

2 Pupils should be taught:

  1. to recognise and compare the main external parts of the bodies of humans and other animals
  2. that humans and other animals need food and water to stay alive

c ) that taking exercise and eating the right types and amounts of food help humans to keep healthy

  1. about the role of drugs as medicines
  2. how to treat animals with care and sensitivity
  3. that humans and other animals can produce offspring and that these offspring grow into adults
  4. about the senses that enable humans and other animals to be aware of the world around them.

Green plants

3 Pupils should be taught:

  1. to recognise that plants need light and water to grow
  2. to recognise and name the leaf, flower, stem and root of flowering plants
  3. that seeds grow into flowering plants.

4 Pupils should be taught to:

  1. recognise similarities and differences between themselves and others, and to treat others with sensitivity
  2. group living things according to observable similarities and differences.

Living things in their environment

5 Pupils should be taught to:

  1. find out about the different kinds of plants and animals in the local environment
  2. identify similarities and differences between local environments and ways in which these affect animals and plants that are found there
  3. care for the environment.

Key Stage 2 tage 2

Sc2 Life processes and living things

Life processes

1 Pupils should be taught:

  1. that the life processes common to humans and other animals include nutrition, movement, growth and reproduction
  2. that the life processes common to plants include growth, nutrition and reproduction
  3. to make links between life processes in familiar animals and plants and the environments in which they are found.

Humans and other animals

2 Pupils should be taught:

Nutrition

  1. about the functions and care of teeth
  2. about the need for food for activity and growth, and about the importance of an adequate and varied diet for health

Circulation

  1. that the heart acts as a pump to circulate the blood through vessels around the body, including through the lungs
  2. about the effect of exercise and rest on pulse rate
  3. that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles to support and protect their bodies and to help them to move

Growth and reproduction

  1. about the main stages of the human life cycle
  2. about the effects on the human body of tobacco, alcohol and other drugs, and how these relate to their personal health
  3. about the importance of exercise for good health

3 Pupils should be taught:

  1. the effect of light, air, water and temperature on plant growth
  2. the role of the leaf in producing new material for growth
  3. that the root anchors the plant, and that water and minerals are taken in through the root and transported through the stem to other parts of the plant

Appendix 2

Notes for Guidance Answering Children’s Questions

Questions should only be invited from the children in the context of work they have been involved in – e.g. watching a video, part of a topic.

It is better to ask the children to generate questions as a group and ask them to be written down. The teacher is then able to group the questions under appropriate headings.

Children should be encouraged not to use “slang” or “family” names and terms. The teacher should always use correct biological terminology. This may mean that a teacher has to interpret a question before reading it out and answering it.

Where a question is deemed inappropriate either because it is not connected to the subject matter being dealt with or because it goes beyond the scope of the school sex education policy / age / stage of development of the pupils, the teacher must either decide to:

  • leave those questions to the end and invite children who have not had their questions answered to speak to the teacher on their own,
  • explain that they are only answering questions on a particular topic. In either case, the most appropriate action may be for the teacher to suggest that the child asks his / her parents.

Where a child asks a question about sex, out of the context of sex education lessons or a related topic, the teacher should speak to the child individually to try to ascertain what has prompted the question e.g. “Why did you want to know that?” The teacher can then respond in one of the ways suggested above.